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Jules Bianchi: Ayrton Senna death a wake-up call F1 never forgot

Tags: nfl
Jules Bianchi: Ayrton Senna death a wake-up call F1 never forgot
jules-bianchi-ayrton-senna-death-a-wake-up-call-f1-never-forgot
The horrific accident suffered by Jules Bianchi, who is http://www.falconsofficialonlineshop.com/FALCONS-STEVE-BARTKOWSKI-JERSEY fighting for his life in a Japanese hospital after crashing at Suzuka on Sunday, has re-focused attention on safety in Formula 1. Within the sport itself, though, the quest to improve safety has never slackened since the death of Ayrton Senna in 1994 led to a long period of self-examination, and an awareness that complacency had set in, to a degree. Senna's death and the terrible weekend at Imola that preceded it - which included the death of another driver, Roland Ratzenberger - for a while seemed to be a threat to the sport itself, such was its global impact. That was a wake-up call for whom those in charge of the sport's governing body, the FIA, have never forgotten. The 20 years since Senna's death have seen a never-ending campaign to increase safety in F1, with advances in technology in every area. Bianchi's accident was a shock to the whole sport. It will certainly lead to another period of introspection and analysis but it won't mark the sea-change seen after Senna. It can't, because the quest for safety has never stopped since. These are some of the key advances in the last 20 years. Tyres have been used to cushion the impact of cars hitting the walls surrounding circuits for years. It sounds rudimentary, but years of research have proved they are very good at absorbing the impact of an F1 car at speed. But two key developments have revolutionised their effectiveness. The first was fixing the barrier to the ground to keep it in place to do its job of absorbing the extreme forces of an F1 crash. The second was to 'belt' the barriers - basically, fastening them together with a strip of strong rubber. This made a significant difference in ensuring cars did not penetrate the barrier itself. That hugely reduced the risk of cars torpedoing through barriers, risking injury to the driver's head when it came in to contact with the tyres. In recent years, a new kind of barrier called TecPro Melvin Ingram Youth Jersey has begun to be introduced. These are an outside casing of polyethylene metallic sheet with high-density foam inside. These have practicality benefits over tyres, but there is not a huge difference in terms of their effectiveness in impact absorption. Senna's death is the aspect of the dreadful weekend at the 1994 San Marino Grand Prix that is most remembered. But among the many horrific incidents was a collision in the pit lane that led to mechanics being injured by a loose wheel. Since then, stricter pit-lane speed limits have been enforced, there have been limitations on the number of people who can be in the pit lane when cars are active on track - in the races, pit-lane reporters from TV companies are now no longer even allowed to move about - and the pit lanes have been 'zoned'. There are three - a 'fast' lane, an acceleration lane, and the pit 'boxes' themselves where the cars stop - and there are strict rules about when a team can release a car from a stop if another is approaching. Retaining devices have recently been fitted to wheels to keep them in place as soon as they are seated on the axle, although the forces involved mean these are not always successful in keeping wheels attached to cars if they are not fitted correctly at a pit stop. Look back at pictures of the cars of the early 1990s, and it is shocking how exposed the drivers' heads, necks and shoulders were. Senna was killed by his front wheel bouncing http://www.officialauthenticcardinals.com/CARDINALS-MICHAEL-FLOYD-JERSEY back and a suspension arm piercing his helmet; Ratzenberger by a broken neck when his car slammed into a wall at close to 200mph. Since then, rule-makers have focused hard on protecting the drivers' heads and necks. The first major step was the introduction of raised cockpit sides and padding in 1996, a development that has extended now to the cockpit sides having a mandated shape aimed at ensuring the best possible protection in an open racing car while not restricting the driver's view too much. By 1994, racing cars were already immensely strong, built as they were of carbon-fibre and Kevlar - Senna would have walked away unhurt from his 135mph impact had he not been unlucky enough to be hit by his wheel. But the structure of the cockpit has since been strengthened, with a minimum thickness of the cockpit wall defined from 2000, as well as the introduction of a layer of Kevlar - used in bullet-proof vests - to prevent intrusion. The ubiquity of electronics in F1 cars in the 21st Century has also allowed the FIA to install cockpit systems that improve safety, including the use of LEDs that correspond with the use of warning flags around the track and maximum speed limits for when the safety car has been deployed but the field has not yet formed up behind it.

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