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Jules Bianchi: What lessons can F1 learn from Japan crash?

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Jules Bianchi: What lessons can F1 learn from Japan crash?
jules-bianchi-what-lessons-can-f1-learn-from-japan-crash
The accident during the Japanese Grand Prix http://www.footballcowboysprostore.com/Nick-Hayden-Jersey that left Marussia driver Jules Bianchi in hospital with severe head injuries is an illustration of the unsolvable and sometimes terrible paradox at the heart of motor racing. No-one wants to see racing drivers hurt, and yet it is an inescapable reality that the very possibility of it is a part of what makes Formula 1 such an intoxicating draw for its participants and the millions who watch it around the world. It has been 20 years since the last driver fatality at a grand prix, when the loss of Ayrton Senna kick-started a renewed drive for greater safety that continues to this day. Yet all the drivers know that they are risking their lives every time they zip up their fireproof overalls, strap on their helmets and head out on to the race track to do what they love. It's an adrenalin fix that those who have experienced it tell you is like nothing else on earth. Risk is part of the challenge, inherent in why drivers are revered, in the same way people admire the astronauts who went to the moon. They are doing something ordinary mortals could not - and would not - do. What they do out there is beyond the bounds of comprehension of ordinary people: a combination of balance, feel, dexterity, skill, judgement and extreme levels of both bravery and physical fitness. The sense of taking man and machine to the limits of the laws of physics and human capability is at the heart of the appeal of F1. Top drivers are the best in the world with the most advanced, challenging and fastest cars science can produce within the limits imposed on them by the rule makers. Those limits are there because the people who run F1 are fully aware of the dangers, and want to limit them as much as possible while maintaining the essence of the sport. How to strike that balance is a debate played out, in rather less sombre circumstances, at virtually every race during a grand prix season. Just two races ago, in Italy, there was a discussion about whether safety changes to the famous Parabolica corner - turning a gravel run-off into an asphalt one - had removed its challenge. And the contradiction organisers are battling with was there again on Sunday. There were the usual complaints about the race starting under the safety car after heavy rain, only for conditions to have improved so much that drivers were in for the lightly treaded 'intermediate' tyres within a couple of laps. Yet later, after Bianchi's accident, there were criticisms that the race had not been stopped sooner when Cowboys Anthony Spencer Youth Jersey the rain came down more heavily. At Suzuka, where Bianchi crashed on Sunday, this contradiction is inherent in the track itself. The drivers love the place because it is what they call an "old-school" circuit, an extreme driving challenge where the risk of an accident is much higher than at more modern circuits, which are often criticised as being sanitised and soulless. Suzuka is often likened to a roller-coaster, but this is a roller-coaster where it is all too easy to come off the rails. Run-offs are small, and mistakes are often punished by impact with a barrier and a damaged car, rather than a second or two lost running wide into a vast expanse of asphalt. For the drivers, the jeopardy inherent in Suzuka is not a bad thing, and for all the greater risk of a crash, very few drivers have been injured there. The run-offs may generally be smaller than those elsewhere, but they tend to do their job. In any case, that is not why Bianchi, a popular and promising talent whose career is only just beginning, is in intensive care in the Mie Prefectural General Medical Center in Yokkaichi. The inquest into what went wrong, and how such an incident can be avoided in the future, has already started, and it will be long and detailed. Although there was a lot of debate over the Japanese Grand Prix weekend about the timing of the race, with typhoon Phanfone approaching the mainland, the fact it was wet was only a circumstantial factor. And debates about the timing of the race are http://www.footballcowboysprostore.com/Ben-Gardner-Jersey essentially irrelevant. Whenever it was held on Sunday, it would have been wet; bands of rain of varying degrees of intensity passed across the track throughout the day. Fundamentally, Bianchi's accident - and, more importantly, the fact that he suffered his awful injuries - was a combination of what world champion Sebastian Vettel called "a very unlucky place and unlucky timing". Bianchi went off at the Dunlop corner, a fast uphill left-hander, which essentially forms the very last part of Suzuka's Esses, regarded by many drivers as the most demanding section of track in the world. The run-off at Dunlop was extended a few years ago, but it remains relatively small in modern F1 terms - the tight confines of the land around Suzuka and the layout of the track mean it would be hard to make it any bigger than it is. So if a driver spins off at Dunlop, he is going to hit the impact-absorbing barrier, as Sauber's Adrian Sutil did the lap before Bianchi's crash.

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