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What does deal mean for fans & clubs

What does deal mean for fans & clubs
what-does-deal-mean-for-fans--clubs


The only answer to that question is because http://www.brownsauthenticofficialstore.com/BROWNS-AHTYBA-RUBIN-JERSEY both Sky and BT believe it is. The breakdown of the bidding means Sky is paying an average of £10.8m for each of the 126 Premier League games it will broadcast each season from 2016-17 until 2018-19, and BT will pay around £7.6m for each of its 42 matches. There are three reasons why these figures are so high. The first is competition. There was interest from Discovery, which owns Eurosport, and BeIN sports, based in Qatar, and that interest has pushed BT and Sky to bid more in order to keep the rights. The second reason is about choice. Sky has about 10.5m subscribers, but has never revealed how many of them buy sports channels. The bidding for the Premier League rights is about much more than sport. It is about being able to attract customers to buy broadband, landline and mobile packages alongside a comprehensive TV offering. On Wednesday, Sky's shares opened more than 4% down, with BT's shares up more than 3%. The third reason is the product itself, the Premier League. The audience tells rights holders it is as absorbing and interesting as ever. Stoke City chairman Peter Coates said: "It is a bit over the top to call it obscene. It is an awful lot of money but we have a responsibility to football as a whole and I am sure we will exercise that responsibility." If the Premier League clubs, players, agents Alex Mack Jersey and sports car dealers are the big winners from this auction, the one potential loser is the viewer. These huge sums of money must be covered and over the course of the next two or three years it would be a surprise if the price of TV packages do not rise to cover some of these costs. The audiences on Sky and BT are huge. Around 1.6m watched the north London derby between Tottenham and Arsenal on BT last Saturday, with almost two million tuning in for the Merseyside derby on Monday. The money this generates for these companies cannot be underestimated. "It's what is known as the 'prune juice effect'," Lord Alan Sugar told BBC Sport. "It goes in one end and goes out the other." The former Tottenham owner, who was involved in Andrew Hawkins Jersey the first Premier League TV rights deal in 1992, added: "The more money that is given to clubs, the more money will end up being spent on players." This issue is one of the most emotive. The Premier League was very quick to say it will invest £168m in "facilities and good causes" and build 152 artificial, all-weather 3G pitches. It will also point to the huge tax revenue from players' wages and argue that more than a sixth of its overall income is distributed beyond the 20 clubs. All of those contributions should also be seen against the backdrop of Premier League clubs paying agents £115m between October 2013 and September 2014. But the reality for Football League clubs and below is that only around 5% of the Premier League's income filters down to grassroots. FC United of Manchester, who play in the Northern Premier League, tier eight of the English football pyramid, are attempting to raise money to fund their new stadium. It would be used as a community hub, a centre for kids and youth club. That could be paid for with the amount of money Sky or BT is spending to broadcast one live match. Former Football Association chief executive Mark Palios, who is now executive chairman at League Two side Tranmere Rovers, said: "You can't defend the issue of player wages. The issue is that the money coming down to grassroots is not entirely correct. "The Premier League do provide a large amount of cash into grassroots but the problem is the structure and efficiency of British sport http://www.brownsauthenticofficialstore.com/BROWNS-BARKEVIOUS-MINGO-JERSEY and how the money is divided. "Politicians can say money needs to be input into grassroots but they should have a look at themselves and the structure they have set up."

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