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who once lived in car and dodged bullets

who once lived in car and dodged bullets
who-once-lived-in-car-and-dodged-bullets
In Miami, it was known as the Liberty City Massacre. On Jan. 23, 2009, a masked man with an AK-47 assault Womens Lawrence Taylor Jersey rifle walked up to a street dice game and opened fire, filling the Miami night with bullets. There were about a dozen people on the sidewalk, including Durell Eskridge and two friends. Eskridge was 17 years old, a gifted athlete whose future was teetering between a life on the streets and the possibility of college football. Everyone on the sidewalk tried to flee, but the odds weren't in favor of humanity at 9:50 that night in front of a grocery store on the corner of Northwest 15th Ave. and 70th St. At least 100 rounds were fired, based on the number of shell casings found by police in the street. Seven people were wounded and two were killed, Derrick Gloster, 18, and Brandon Mills, 16. They were Ekridge's friends. It was called one of the bloodiest mass shootings in the city's history. Eskridge got away, and he kept going and going, all the way to a full scholarship at Syracuse University and a free-agent contract with the New York Jets. "They were killed in front of my face," the Josh Brown Youth Jersey rookie safety said at training camp, remembering his childhood friends. "I could've been one of those guys, but I escaped. When I saw the gunman, I took off running. When I took off running, I was able to look back and I saw my friends getting shot up on the wall. "That next morning, I walked down to the crime scene, just to see their blood still spattered right there. I said to myself, 'I can't do this; this isn't how I want to end up.' I couldn't do it to my mother. I had to find a way. I had to get up out of that place. I had to get my mom out of that place." For some reason, Eskridge was spared. Maybe it was because he was a fast runner. Maybe it was the phone call he received a few minutes earlier from a guardian angel, warning him of potential trouble. Maybe it was just random luck. Not a single bullet from the hail of gunfire found his body, and he took that as a message. From then on, he decided to make changes in his life. That Eskridge has made it to an NFL training camp is a small miracle. He grew up in the Pork 'n' Beans projects in Liberty City, one of Florida's poorest and most dangerous neighborhoods. He was homeless for a period of three years, living in shelters and later a car -- a green Mitsubishi Mirage. Green is the color of his new team, giving him an appreciation for the color that once symbolized his lowest point in life. He lived in the car with his mother, two of his sisters and their belongings. Sleeping was difficult. As Eskridge said, "We were scrunched on bags of clothes. But we made it work." His mother, Margaret, raised eight kids, including a daughter, Shantrell, with cerebral palsy. Margaret worked odd jobs, trying to make enough for food and housing, but there was a point when it became too much. They went to a homeless shelter, but the environment was uncomfortable for a mother with small children. "The boys and girls couldn't sleep together, so I couldn't http://www.nflgiantsofficialonlines.com/GIANTS-JAYRON-HOSLEY-JERSEY stay with my mom," Eskridge said. "I had to sleep in room with strangers, older men, homeless men. I was 10 or 11 years old. Having to sleep around those guys, my mom got sick of it. She didn't trust the guys that were laying next to me at the homeless shelter. She decided she'd rather sleep in a car, together."

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